trauma

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 17Sep2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Are you ripening… or so afraid of surrendering to harvest that you’re kinda sorta rotting? Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. Verwell Mind has some intriguing bits to share about the emerging science of intergenerational trauma and epigenetics.
  2. “The beautiful thing about praying with Mary through her sorrows is that we realize we are not alone in ours.” MaryBeth Eberhard is at Catholic Mom with Opening Our Hearts.
  3. “Among the book’s key takeaways, the researchers found that… 70 percent had previously experienced childhood trauma.” I mean… surprise? How to Stop School Shooter Violence.
  4. Many of us struggle with thinking we have to do it all and do it perfectly–leading to overwhelm. Lisa Simmons is at Catholic Mom with God Bless My Drunk Squirrels: a Lesson in Letting Go and Letting God.
  5. Many trauma survivors & mental health warriors battle insomnia. Rachel Watkins is at Catholic Mom with Sleeping Well.
  6. Maria Gallagher at Catholic Mom writes about riding the wave of our emotions in Are You There, God?
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

For this week’s media, I’m delighted to share my chat with Rachel at To Grow Good, a podcast devoted to sharing the faith through conversion & reversion stories.

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 10Sep2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Are you blooming or maybe going into dormancy? Is one better than the other? Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. I mean, surprise? Adverse childhood experiences can contribute to drug use.
  2. Gentleness is a virtue that tends to be in short supply in families affected by abuse and dysfunction. Catholic Mom’s Marlon De La Torre has a lovely piece on The Gentleness of Conversion.
  3. Here’s an interesting piece on boundaries: At what point does PTSD become an excuse for bad behavior?
  4. “‘The combination of negative emotions – exacerbated by stressors such as poverty, unresolved trauma and mental health issues — ‘leaves the home and enters the streets looking like violence,’ said Kennedy.” Read more at Catholic Philly’s piece on Data needed to find the core of rising violence in Philadelphia.
  5. “And, yet, even when we push kids out of school — or politicians out of office — they never really disappear. They still are a part of our communities, impacting others and themselves.” Read more at Disruptive students often facing challenges at home and communities deserve acts of reparative justice.
  6. Rejection is trauma. Catholic Mom’s Holly Novotny writes about Uniting Our Rejection With Christ’s.
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

I’m trying to shy away from using the word “toxic” describe people and am loving using the more accurate and hopeful (I believe) immature to describe some people with harmful patterns of behavior. Thus, for this week’s media, here’s Dr. Les Carter.

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!

Open Book: Book Recs September 2021

Carolyn Astfalk has a first Wednesday of the month book review linkup, shared also at Catholic Mom!

open-book-logo2018

This Month’s Covers

Love & Responsibility John Paul II: A Simplified Version by Monsignor Vincent M. Walsh

From Amazon:

This project has been Approved by the Vatican Secretary of the State. In his brilliance, Pope writes in a style which is difficult for the average reader. Therefore the goal of A Simplified Version is to allow the brilliance of the Pope’s thoughts to be grasped by a wider audience. All of the words, thoughts and reasoning processes in this book are the Pope’s. Nothing has been watered down. Therefore the reader will see the beauty of his ideas and the clear flow of his reasoning.

My Thoughts:

I love JPII. I have found him difficult to read. Even this simplified version had some jumbly bits, but all in all, it was way easier to finish than the original Love & Responsibility without losing its authenticity. 5/5

The Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park

From Amazon: In a riveting narrative set in fifteenth-century Korea, two brothers discover a shared passion for kites. Kee-sup can craft a kite unequaled in strength and beauty, but his younger brother, Young-sup, can fly a kite as if he controlled the wind itself. Their combined skills attract the notice of Korea’s young king, who chooses Young-sup to fly the royal kite in the New Year kite-flying competition–an honor that is also an awesome responsibility. Although tradition decrees, and the boys’ father insists, that the older brother represent the family, both brothers know that this time the family’s honor is best left in Young-sup’s hands. This touching and suspenseful story, filled with the authentic detail and flavor of traditional Korean kite fighting, brings a remarkable setting vividly to life.. 

My thoughts: Got this from the library to pre-read for my 11yo, as we’re doing a quick dip into Asian history before we fully open up our ancient Western history study for this school year. It was a very sweet read that I enjoyed, with believable characters in an emotionally challenging situation, playing family honor versus duty to king and country, not to mention the youthful quest to become master of one’s emotional landscape. It’s a very easy read, however, and (seriously not bragging here) the reader in question just started Lord of the Rings, so I don’t know if I’ll be able to entice her to pick this up. 5/5

Falling for Your Madness by Katharine Grubb

From Amazon: Eccentric literature professor David approaches Laura for a counter-cultural, rule-filled relationship filled with poetry, flowers and bottom-less cups of tea. He makes it very clear to her that they are just friends. If she wants to be more — if she wants to be sweethearts — then she is the only one that can move them forward. Laura is smitten by his humor, his charm, and his English accent (which turns out to be fake). In his company, she has never felt more beautiful or ladylike. David tells Laura that the reason he has these rules is because he is bound by the laws of chivalry, both body and soul. Then Laura finds out the real reason, one that’s ancient, filled with legend and magic. Yet Laura has complete control of this madman. Should she release him or tell him she wants more? Is he eccentric or just mad? Falling For Your Madness is not just a romantic comedy, but it also asks the question, who has the most power in a relationship? The lady? Or the gentleman?

My thoughts: I have had this on my TBR pile for so long that it’s embarrassing (so writer friends who’ve given me books to review in the past five or so years? It’s not you. It’s me.) Anyway, this was a fun, sweet read with a romance that makes the reader ask all the best questions about relationships. I do have qualms with how David never quite learns to use his rules as tools rather than being ruled by them (and more details than that would be spoilers), which would have made the relationship more satisfying for me, but as wish-fulfillment stories go, this one’s pretty fulfilling. 4/5 stars

Also… 

Kristin Lavransdatter : Reader, I gave up. Seeing her make the emotionally intoxicated decisions she was making at Nonnesetter… it was like watching a slug pour salt on itself. It’s okay to have boundaries, even in highly acclaimed Catholic fiction.

What are you reading?  Don’t forget to link up YOUR #OpenBook reviews over at Carolyn’s!

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 27Aug2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Are you ripening… or so afraid of surrendering to harvest that you’re kinda sorta rotting? Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. Lara Patangan of Catholic Mom and Simple Mercies writes about one of my favorite, most life-giving topics: boundaries.
  2. So here’s a fun one: Do Wild Animals Get PTSD?
  3. Codependency & Self-Care asks “What if the people pleaser is the self that needs to die?”
  4. The Undone Mama reminds us about how toxic parents turn into toxic grandparents: if they are toxic to you, they are toxic to your kids.
  5. Catholic In Recovery’s Chloe writes about How Saint Joseph Is Healing My Father Wound.
  6. We have a good number of new subscribers lately (::waves::), so here’s a pretty concise, informative piece on The Narcissistically Disordered Family. Does any of this resonate with your experience?
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

For this week’s media, let’s see what we can learn about… eyebrows?

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 3Sep2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Are you blooming or maybe going into dormancy? Is one better than the other? Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. My dear Christine Johnson is at Catholic Mom talking about “Jesus, I trust in You… sort of.”
  2. We all know narcissism is bad. Alas, just doing the opposite of the narcissists in your life wreaks is own havoc. Here’s an article at Your Tango on Echoism.
  3. Imposter Syndrome is fancy pants talk for “I have to be enough.” Lindsay Schlege of Quote Me wrote the linked article over at Catholic Mom.
  4. Trauma brings changes, to say the least. Hillary Ibara is at Catholic Mom talking about Christ’s Mercy.
  5. I regularly hear from people, “My story isn’t like yours, but I can relate to [fill in the blank with some maladaptive coping mechanism].” Well, maybe trauma doesn’t look the way you expect it to, and maybe its effects manifest in ways you overlook.
  6. Carmen Lappe is at Catholic Mom with a story so many trauma survivors can relate to in a special way: Can Anger Be Virtuous?
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

For this week’s media, I’m sharing my chat with Anne DeSantis of Patchwork Hear Ministry’s Sewing Hope podcast!

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 20Aug2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Is how you are moving your body contributing to your mental health and overall freedom? Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. More admiration, love and support to fellow Catholic trauma survivor Simone Biles: Leticia Adams writes at OSV News about Simone Biles, mental health, and the path to true discipleship.
  2. Another one (because, dang, Simone–you teach us so much!): What Simone Biles Allowed Me to Teach My Daughter by Teri Sinnott at Catholic Mom.
  3. On that note, here’s something on How to talk about your mental health with your employer.
  4. Trauma survivors… we all carry all kinds of burdens. Catholic Mom’s Jessica Ptomey shares her article Check Your Burdens.
  5. Surrender troubles? Here are four steps to achieving surrender (I’d add a fifth: think of something else–and if you can’t, ask God to give you a new thought) from Laura Range at Catholic Mom.
  6. Parenting teens triggers a LOT of abandonment fears/behaviors in developmental trauma survivors (ask me how I know). Here’s another article on the “thou shalts” rather than just the “thou shalt nots” of parenting teens: Sherry Antonetti’s Helping Your Teens to Know God’s Love at Catholic Mom.
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

For this week’s media, I’m sharing my chat with Anne DeSantis of Patchwork Hear Ministry’s Sewing Hope podcast!

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!

Open Book: Book Recs August 2021

Carolyn Astfalk has a first Wednesday of the month book review linkup, shared also at Catholic Mom!

open-book-logo2018

This Month’s Covers

Never Enough: the Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction by Judith Grisel

From Amazon: Judith Grisel was a daily drug user and college dropout when she began to consider that her addiction might have a cure, one that she herself could perhaps discover by studying the brain. Now, after 25 years as a neuroscientist, she shares what she and other scientists have learned about addiction, enriched by captivating glimpses of her personal journey. 

My thoughts: amazing look at the process of addiction from all angles, intellectual/clinical and personal/visceral. Grisel reintroduced me to tachyphylaxis and opponent-process theory , both of which explain so much of how our God-designed minds operate in this fallen world. It’s amazing.  (library book)

Harriet, You’ll Drive Me Wild by Mem Fox, illustrated by Marla Frazee

From Amazon: Harriet doesn’t mean to be pesky. Sometimes she just is. And her mother doesn’t mean to lose her temper. Sometimes she just does. But Harriet and her mother know that even when they do things they wish they hadn’t, they still love each other very much.

My thoughts: This was a very sweet look at how children and the adults they become are never perfect, never have it all together, and sometimes things just happen in spite of all our efforts to keep them from happening. The only thing we can do is love each other through our mistakes. 

The Way of Perfection by Teresa of Avila

From Christian Book Distributors: Although Teresa of Avila lived five centuries ago, her superbly inspiring classic on the practice of prayer is as fresh and meaningful today as it was when she first wrote it. Teresa’s strong desire throughout is to lead readers into a deeper and prevailing life of prayer. She begins with a treatment of the three essentials of the prayer-filled life—fraternal love, detachment from created things, and authentic humility. Building on that foundation, she then teaches on the cherished practices of prayer and contemplation. Finally, she provides a detailed and moving discourse on the Lord’s Prayer. Experience the fervent devotion of St. Teresa, and allow her to help you explore the rewarding discipline of contemplative prayer. 

My thoughts: Still working on it, but I just adore St. Teresa already. She’s so straightforward and downright salty sometimes that I can’t help but hang on her every word. I’m not a big underliner-in-books, but this is making me break my rule.  (Disclaimer: skipped the Rohr-ward) 

The Golden Goblet by Eloise Jarvis McGraw

From Amazon: (Winner of a Newbery Honor, an exciting ancient Egyptian mystery) Ranofer wants only one thing in the world: to be a master goldsmith like his beloved father was. But how can he when he is all but imprisoned by his evil half brother, Gebu? Ranofer knows the only way he can escape Gebu’s abuse is by changing his destiny. But can a poor boy with no skills survive on the cutthroat streets of ancient Thebes? Then Ranofer finds a priceless golden goblet in Gebu’s room and he knows his luck−and his destiny−are about to change.

My thoughts: We are doing ancient history with Story of Civilization, Volume I this year for sixth grade, and I try to assign literary study that matches our history work as much as possible. The Golden Goblet is a well-told mystery story with a sympathetic, imperfect but integrity-driven main character. It’s boy-heavy, but I think my girl-reader will survive.

Also… 

Kristin Lavransdatter (still haven’t finished it–I’m honestly not sure I’ve made any progress since last month’s Open Book)

What are you reading?  Don’t forget to link up YOUR #OpenBook reviews over at Carolyn’s!

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 30Jul2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Is how you are moving your body contributing to your mental health and overall freedom? Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. Couldn’t go this week without sending tons and tons of love and support to fellow Catholic trauma survivor Simone Biles. “You want your mind for the rest of your life.”
  2. Those of us who fear that we are angrier than God is about ways others have sinned against us might find some healing in reading Hezekiah’s prayer as a model for us.
  3. Speaking of anger, Rachel Bulman is talking at Catholic Mom about a new book that helps families deal with anger.
  4. Seeing a theme here? Catholic Mom has books for the girl mom on yelling.
  5. I got to talk with Carrie Soukoup on Catholic Mom’s weekly IG Live. We chatted about honoring the needs of our teens and tweens when we ourselves are recovering from childhood trauma. Watch to find out what that has to do with Parenting Tombs and Gardens.
  6. Read at Catholic Mom on how His Gaze Heals Me.
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

For this week’s media, I wanted to share a bit of a victory I experienced this week–one I turned into a TikTok, hopefully for your enjoyment or at least for the relatability.

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 23Jul2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Are you on the right path? Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. Chances are that, if you’re reading this, you could write your own article on 3 Ways Unresolved Trauma Can Derail Your Relationships.
  2. This one’s mine: Parenting Tombs and Gardens at Catholic Mom is about parenting the rightfully emotionally immature while simultaneously healing from the effects of having been parented by the wrongfully emotionally immature.
  3. What is self-care, anyway? Learn from Rose Folsom and a bean sprout.
  4. Even the secular world is celebrating the healthy gifts of detachment.
  5. Betrayal trauma is a thing. Elaine Sinnott gets real at Catholic Mom about The Epidemic of Porn in Marriages.
  6. Loving-kindness meditation may reduce veterans’ PTSD symptoms?
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

This week’s media? Father Mike Schmitz has a lot of good things to say–this is about setting boundaries! Isn’t his thumbnail picture the best? So relatable.

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!

7QT for Catholic Trauma Survivors 16Jul2021

Here’s me, doing my bit to participate weekly in Kelly’s Seven Quick Takes over at This Ain’t the Lyceum.

So here’s…

This Week’s Resources for Catholic Trauma Survivors

Takes. Best described as quick. Seven of them.

Look! It’s a Mt. of Caramel! Happy Feast of Our Lady! Is there a Beatitude that would make your life a little sweeter?
Maybe it’s time to find your rut-busting Beatitude. Image: Unsplash
  1. Trauma of any kind is “not supposed to happen.” Nicole Johnson tells her story at Catholic Mom.
  2. Need strength? Alateia has you covered.
  3. Red flags or green ones? The Good Men Project has 4 Signs You’re in a Toxic Relationship.
  4. The Pittsburgh Catholic has a piece on Catholic at Home: Faith & Mental Health.
  5. It’s from May, but every month can be Mary’s Month if you try hard enough. Patrice Fagnant-Macarthur is at Catholic Mom with Mary Can Help Us Forgive Our Mothers.
  6. Did I post this one already? A woman is running across New York State in a wedding dress to bring attention to narcissistic abuse in marriage.
  7. Ending with your weekly reminder that All Things New: Breaking the Cycle and Raising a Joyful Family is available for purchase. Already read your copy? Leave a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads, and don’t forget to link up with this month’s An Open Book from Carolyn Astfalk & Catholic Mom.

This week’s media? More Cinema Therapy! I love what they’re saying about Cap: integrity vs. ideology.

And now go give Kelly and her 7QTs a look see!