rebecca willen

Sabbath Rest Book Talk/Open Book [August 2017]

Carolyn Astfalk has a first Wednesday of the month book review linkup!

an-open-book

The aforementioned Carolyn also joins me and Rebecca Willen every month for Sabbath Rest Book Talk.

Sabbath Rest Book Talk: a monthly live interactive event where we talk about the value of fiction in developing compassion, empathy, and healthy relationships

Our selections for August were:

Sabbath Rest Book Talk: Where Fiction Is Good For You! Join us for August 2017, and we'll talk about how these books show us what we humans can learn about growing up.

Adult Book: Soulless Creatures by Katharine Grubb

YA Book: Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink

Children’s/Readaloud: Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White

And here’s what we had to say about them:

And big congrats to Lisa Hendey, who won the signed paperback copy of Soulless Creatures by Katharine Grubb!

Plus, click here to check out our

NEW GOODREADS FEATURE!

It’s a list! On Goodreads! Vote for books we’ve already featured and add any books you think we should discuss in the future!

Remember, all SRBTs here on out, I’ll continue announcing the book selections and focus ahead of time, so you can read along and join the discussion a little more easily and thoughtfully. Voila, for September:

OpalsJubileeCover GoodMasterCover AnneGreenGablesCover

Adult Book: Opal’s Jubilee by Leslie Lynch

YA Book: The Good Master by Kate Seredy

Children’s/Readaloud: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

KEEP YOUR EYES PEELED FOR AN OPAL’S JUBILEE GIVEAWAY:

deets on the way.  

That’s it for August! While we’re here, gentle reminder: To keep on top of each month’s SRBT selections, do sign up for my monthly newsletter. For notifications that each month’s SRBT is available for viewing/listening, subscribe to my YouTube channel.

What’s your #OpenBook?

Don’t forget to link up YOUR #OpenBook reviews over at Carolyn’s!

Sabbath Rest Book Talk: Where Fiction is Good for You! Join us for a monthly video exchange on how fiction makes us more human.

Sabbath Rest Books Talk/An Open Book (March 2017)

Carolyn Astfalk has a first Wednesday of the month book review linkup!

an-open-book

 Sabbath Rest Book Talk returns this Sunday, March 5 at 7pm Eastern!

Sabbath Rest Book Talk: a monthly live interactive event where we talk about the value of fiction in developing compassion, empathy, and healthy relationships

Please join me along with co-hosts Carolyn Astfalk and Rebecca Willen over on my YouTube Channel as a YouTube Live Event.  You can still comment and play along, of course.  Our focus will be JUSTICE and our featured fiction will be:

Sabbath Rest Book Talk: Where Fiction is Good for You! March 5, 2017 at 7pm Eastern Time, we'll be discussing JUSTICE in fiction.

Dying for Revenge by Barbara Golder (reviewed on this blog here)

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel by Virginia Lee Burton

People, I am really fired up to talk about To Kill a Mockingbird.  This is the third time I’ve read it.  The first time was in high school, and I mostly relied on the movie to help me just barely pass my test, because I was a lazy student.  The second time was about 15 years ago, and I loved it… but I felt I didn’t get the ending.  I wasn’t even troubled by it.  I just assumed I didn’t get it, and the problem was with me.  Who was I to judge an American classic with strong moral themes?

This time?

I’ll be honest.

I.  Am. Cheesed.  Off.

That seems like such a blasphemous thing to say, from an American of (presumably) decent conscience.  How can you be angry with To Kill a Mockingbird?! What are you, some sort of racist monster?

Lord, defend me from the sin of racism.  However, Lord, defend us all from the sin of self-justification.

Want more? You will just have to watch this month’s Sabbath Rest Book Talk.

Remember, all SRBTs here on out, I’ll continue announcing the book selections and focus ahead of time, so you can read along and join the discussion a little more easily and thoughtfully. Voila, for April:

Sabbath Rest Book Talk, April 2, 2017, 7pm Eastern. Our focus will be SELF-SACRIFICE

 To keep on top of each month’s SRBT selections, do sign up for my monthly newsletter.

That’s it for March!  While we’re here, gentle reminder: To keep on top of each month’s SRBT selections, do sign up for my monthly newsletter.

What’s your #OpenBook?

Don’t forget to link up YOUR #OpenBook reviews over at Carolyn’s!

Sabbath Rest Book Talk: Where Fiction Is Good For You! (March 5, 2017 at 7pm Eastern Time) Link available in video

Word Addiction! A Guest Post from Rebecca Willen

Welcome, Tomato Pie Fans! I’m taking a hiatus from blogging to finish the sequel to DON’T YOU FORGET ABOUT ME. Meanwhile, I have a series of guest bloggers taking care of the place. Let’s meet today’s guest, Rebecca Willen.

I Admit It! I Have a Word Addiction.

RebeccaWillenDo you ever feel a shiver up your spine when a particular phrase of prose or poetry hits you just right?  Do you visualize conversations in your head in Times New Roman, 12 point?  Do you enjoy Bananagrams, Scrabble, and crosswords?  Do you get absurdly excited about new bookshelves?

If so, you might just be a word addict like me.  Welcome to the club!

Whenever I get the dreaded interview question “Tell me about yourself,” my answer usually involves the fact that I really like words and people.  My two loves work in tandem – words have little purpose without someone to listen or read them but find their end in the communication of truth to a receptive mind.  Likewise, communication, counsel, teaching, and so many other forms of written or spoken words help people to bond and grow.

The challenge with technology and social media is that the value of words can be lost.  Popular vocabulary is dwindling, and the beauty of a word is reduced to an arbitrary number of characters, or an attempt to catch a short attention span.  On the other hand, the myriad methods of communication, and the speed at which words can be transmitted from one person to another, allow words to gain new impact and power.

For a word addict like me, the challenge is to reinforce in my friends, my readers, and all those with whom I communicate, the truth that words are important.  Every word you use, down to its order in a sentence and the inflection of your voice, carries with it a vast array of connotations and connections.  A good writer knows how to use words to draw a reader into their story, to wring the heart and spark thoughts in the mind.  A good speaker knows how to grab the audience’s attention and keep it, while communicating important information in a way that interests and encourages retention.

As a Catholic, I have a great responsibility for the words I use.  I can, and must, try to communicate God Himself, infinite Truth, through words.  A single word misspoken can ruin another person’s image of the Church; in an apologetic conversation, a badly-used term can muddy the waters; in counsel, a wrong word can ruin a friendship.  But think of what can be done positively through words!  Look at the great saints and writers of the Church.  They took their responsibility seriously and gave words their greatest possible power for good.

I like to help words achieve that power, in my own little way.  Right now, that means working as a freelance proofreader and getting experience so that someday I can be an editor.  (Consider this a commercial break—I’m looking for proofreading jobs starting in September!)  And honestly, you’d be surprised how a misplaced comma or badly chosen word can mess up the message of a sentence or work.  Writing is also fun and valuable, something in which I’m trying to grow.

If you’re a word addict, writer, speaker, blogger, bibliophile, or use social media, be encouraged!  The Word has given Himself to be our aid and support.  May the Lord bless and keep you in all that you do with the words He has given.

Rebecca is a confirmed bibliophile, a word addict, and if you haven’t guessed, a bit of a nerd.  Having recently graduated from Christendom College, she’s starting out in the world as an anachronistic millennial, and retains her sanity by never leaving the apartment without a book.  She writes at Our Hearts are Restless, and works as a database analyst and freelance proofreader. Contact Rebecca.